New literacy practices of a mother from a(n) (im)migrant South Korean family in Canada

Ji Eun Kim, Ryan Deschambault

Abstract


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The purpose of this study was to explore one South Korean mother’s literacy practices after she had migrated to Canada for the purpose of overseeing her children’s education. Using a case study method, we focused on language, media, domains, and purposes of literacy practices in Korea and Canada. Data were obtained through two semi-structured interviews, two home visit observations, a questionnaire, and collection of literacy artifacts. The documented changes in her literacy practices, as well as the theoretical and methodological approaches used to document them, offer promising areas and approaches for future research about the out-of-school literacy practices of (im)migrant students.


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